LYTTON FIRST NATION - STEIN WATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENT PROJECT

Welcome

Welcome to the project website for the Lytton First Nation Stein Water System Improvement Project.

As part the recovery efforts following the Lytton Creek wildfire in 2021, 39 temporary modular homes were constructed on Inkluckcheen IR 21 and Nuuautin IR 2 in 2022, along with a new community centre and band office. Additional homes are still needed, and it is a significant priority for LFN to build more homes for community members that are still without housing. Therefore, Lytton First Nation (LFN) has contracted Aplin Martin to design a 28-home subdivision (aplinmartin.com/lfnsubdivision) that will be located at Nuuautin IR 2B. The Federal government is funding this project through Indigenous Services Canada Community Initiatives.

The Stein Water System that services Lytton First Nation is nearing its limit for required water capacity, and will need to be upgraded to service the new 28-lot subdivision. Aplin Martin has also been contracted by Lytton First Nation to design the water system improvements. This upgrade to the system will provide service to the new 28-lot subdivision, address existing and future capacity concerns, and increase the reliability of the existing system, ensuring long term sustainability, and community safety.

Subject Site

Project Summary

A significant portion of development on LFN reserves, including existing housing and community facilities, receives domestic water and fire protection from the Stein Water System. The Water System draws water from the Stein River, treats this water, and delivers it across a vast area of LFN reserves on the west and east sides of the Fraser River. Upgraded and expanded infrastructure is needed to support community growth and disaster recovery effectively, in addition to meeting current and future demands, including fire protection.

In 2023, a feasibility study was undertaken that identified key upgrades needed for the Stein Water System, and following this work, LFN selected Aplin Martin to complete the improvements. Aplin Martin will complete preliminary design, followed by detailed design of the Stein Water System improvements, and prepare a tender ready package for construction. The upgrades will include a new water reservoir above the Nuuautin IR 2B development, a connection to the proposed development, a tie-in to the existing system, upgrades to the existing pump stations, and upgrades to the existing water treatment system. As part of a separate project, the Stein River intake will also be upgraded. These upgrades will address existing supply concerns, increase reliability of the system, and provide capacity for the next 20-years, based on the current rate of on-reserve population growth.

There will be a community open house on May 2nd, 2024, at Battlefield Community Centre from 1:30-3:30 PM, where you may attend to learn more about the project and provide feedback. The opportunity to provide feedback on the preliminary Stein Water System design will be between May 2nd to April 16th. However, you may provide general feedback, and ask questions at any time during the project. Other ways you can provide feedback on the project are listed below. 

Project Team

project tasks

Frequently asked questions

  1. What is happening?

The Stein Water System Improvement Project is a project to upgrade the Stein Water System which serves Lytton First Nation (LFN) reserves. This upgrade is needed to service the community including recent developments from the wildfire recovery efforts, and the 28-Home Subdivision Project (aplinmartin.com/lfnsubdivision).

  1. What is being proposed?

The upgrades to the Stein Water System will include a new intake on the Stein River, a new water reservoir above the Nuuautin IR 2B development, water main connection to the proposed development, a tie-in to the existing system, and upgrades to the current water treatment system.

  1. How was the 28-home subdivision site selected?

The location of the subdivision was selected by LFN based on an initial feasibility study, consistency with LFN land use plans, and the apparent lack of archaeological concerns. This project originates from a previous community engagement and community approval of 2006. This area was known as East Fraser Subdivision (99-unit subdivision), referenced in the LFN land use plan (2016), also in every CCP, since starting CCP work.

  1. What is the expected timeline for completion?

To be determined.

  1. My biggest concern is will we have enough water to sufficiently supply all homes? We already are short of water.

Ensuring an adequate water supply for all homes, as well as an emergency and fire storage supply, is crucial. The upgrades planned for the Stein Water System, including a new intake, reservoir, and system improvements, aim to address these challenges by increasing capacity and reliability. The water system upgrades are designed to accommodate the 20-year forecasted on-reserve population and fire suppression capacity; therefore, the upgrades are planned to provide capacity for the next 20-years at a minimum, based on the current rate of on-reserve population growth.the upgrades, ongoing monitoring and management of water resources will be essential to sustainably manage the supply over the long term. The Lytton First Nation Operations & Maintenance Manager and Housing Department Manager are directly involved with the water system improvement design planning.

  1. What if, there's lower water system, because of more homes?

Ensuring an adequate water supply for all homes, as well as an emergency and fire storage supply, is crucial. The upgrades planned for the Stein Water System, including a new intake, reservoir, and system improvements, aim to address these challenges by increasing capacity and reliability. The water system upgrades are designed to accommodate the 20-year forecasted on-reserve population; therefore, the upgrades are planned to provide capacity for the next 20-years at a minimum, based on the current rate of on-reserve population growth. Following the upgrades, ongoing monitoring and management of water resources will be essential to sustainably manage the supply over the long term. Concurrent with the Stein Water System improvement design there is funding discussions with Indigenous Services Canada to start hydrologic review and water licensing on the Stein River to assess the amount of annual water flow to sustain an increase for Lytton First Nation water license.

  1. Is there not enough money for regular built homes, other than modular homes?
The planning with the Federal government for the one-time offer to fund 28-homes for those that lost their home or rental unit in the Village of Lytton 2021 wildfire was for a mix of stick builds and modular homes but with the timing for the government to provide funding we are now going on 3-years and those that need a home are still living elsewhere so the plan changed to modular homes to complete home installs sooner than it would take to do stick builds. Modular home building quality have improved in the last 20-years and the fire-resistant building materials used are high quality. Funding has now been approved by the Federal government for modular homes.
  1. How big is the property?
The subdivision area is 6.62 ha in size, and the lot sizes range between approx. 11,876.74 square feet (1,110 sq. m) and 17,286.40 square feet (1,600 sq. m).
  1. Can you build a workshop on the property? Can you put a bigger deck, if you ask?

These homes will fall under the Lytton First Nation Housing Policy. They are rental homes and not homes for purchase to be privately owned. The subdivision is being built with fire smart build back better that have the best fire-resistant materials. Any additions to the homes or out-buildings will follow the Housing Policy. Each home will have a septic system and field which cannot have traffic vehicles or out-buildings on those areas.

  1. How will the design support a sustainable system that lasts longer than 10 years?

The proposed water system upgrades are designed to meet the needs of LFN’s growing community over the next 20 years. We've also factored in various potential risks like fire hazards, environmental impacts, and internal system challenges to ensure long term sustainability. While we're still finalizing the design details, sustainability measures are a key focus for us. Once the design is complete, we'll be able to provide more specific information on the sustainability features we're incorporating. For now, know that we're dedicated to creating a system that not only meets current needs but also stands the test of time.

  1. How much training needs to take place for the maintenance of the new system? How many more people are needed to maintain the system? Who will do the training?

As noted above: The Lytton First Nation Operations & Maintenance Manager and Housing Department Manager are directly involved with the water system improvement design planning. There will be a need for increased capacity/workers and equipment for the new subdivision in the Housing Department and Operations & Maintenance Department. Those new employee needs will be posted when we are closer to completion.

  1. Will the system support the broader community i.e past 3 mile on Hwy 12?

The system is designed to maintain service for properties currently connected to the Stein Water System, stretching southeast to two-mile road. With the addition of the new reservoir, pumpstation, and completion of upgrades to one of the existing pumpstations, we're not only servicing the IR 2B subdivision, but also enhancing capacity and serviceability for the entire Stein Water System. This reservoir is being designed to accommodate the forecasted on-reserve population growth over the next 20 years. However, the scope of this project doesn't include extending the water system to new areas other than to service the IR2B subdivision development. Once the Subdivision is complete, the Chief & Council will increase the community development planning to determine services to the broader community.

  1. Are the 28 homes just for rent or are they going to be rent to own.

The fund agreement with the Federal government and the funding agency Indigenous Services Canada, Community Initiatives Program have noted that these 28-homes will be rental units managed by Lytton First Nation Housing Department. This understanding will need to be delivered to project completion. Should there be any changes to the asset management plan, this would be a decision of Chief and Council

  1. How can people find out about possible job opportunities for LFN Members working on these development projects?

To learn about possible opportunities, please reach out Leonora Thomas by email Leonora.thomas@lfn.band and by phone at 250 455 2304.

  1. Has the current usage in percentage been determined for the 1997 Stein Water system design capacity?

Based on the feasibility study conducted on August 9, 2023, for the Stein Water System Upgrades project; The current water system is operating at about 50% of its total capacity to meet the Maximum Daily Demand (MDD) flow, which is the highest amount of water used throughout the day.However, when it comes to the Peak Hour Demand (PHD) flow, the system is using all available capacity to meet the demand during the busiest hours. Additionally, there are some areas within the system where the available storage for fire suppression is insufficient, which means that the system may not be adequately equipped to handle fire emergencies in those locations. In simpler terms, this means that while the water system can handle regular daily demands well, it might struggle to cope with sudden high demands, especially during peak hours, and there may be areas where firefighting capabilities are limited. We are currently going to predesign/design and hydrology review of the Stein for water license application for increase in drawdown to improve capacity of water availability to the communities. This will also be supported by a new intake and new reservoir.

  1. Has an expected demand for the proposed housing been determined?

Yes, the expected demand for the next 20-years of on-reserve population has been determined, including the anticipated demand from the proposed IR2B development of 28-homes. The proposed upgrades to the system will provide capacity for the forecasted 20-year on-reserve population.

  1. As there is high potential for another wildfire to go through this area, has an adequate emergency route been planned?  

Yes, to address the potential for another wildfire in the area, both Green Meadows Road and Alkali Road will be upgraded and designated as Emergency Egress routes for the 28-home subdivision and other homes up Alkali road.

  1. When this subdivision was first planned, the blackwater was designed to be pumped to a lagoon on IR 21B, will this previous design still be considered?  

One of the reasons behind pumping the blackwater to a lagoon is that it would save on frontage space for the homes and if this is being considered, the location of the piping going from IR 2B to IR 21B could also provide an emergency access route. In the bi-weekly technical meetings between Indigenous Services Canada, LFN Team and Aplin Martin, Dan Ferguson, Regional Health Officer was invited, and he spoke to the need for planning for a wastewater treatment facility. The government replied that the wastewater facility is in the 5 to 10 year plan for LFN and the current project approved for funding will include septic systems for each home. 

HOW CAN YOU PROVIDE INPUT?

We highly value every voice and contribution to the project’s development. Your participation is important. There are multiple ways and opportunities to contribute and stay informed, including:

  • LFN community newsletter updates

  • Aplin Martin Project webpage

  • LFN Facebook page

  • A Community Open House on May 2nd from 1:30-3:30 PM, at the Battlefield Community Centre

All community engagement sessions will be held to gather your valuable feedback, with a commitment to prioritizing community voices, respecting cultural significance, and hounouring traditional practices. Following all events, we will share how your feedback has influenced the project.

Your Feedback

Thank you for taking the time to review the project information. As an integral part of the public consultation process, we welcome and encourage your comments, questions, and feedback via email to openhouse@aplinmartin.com.


The responses sent to this email will be answered within 3-5 business days. The opportunity to provide feedback on the Preliminary Stein Water System Design is between May 2nd to May 16th. However, you may provide general feedback, and ask questions at any time during the project.

Thank you for sharing your thoughts, comments, and questions regarding the proposed application. Your insights will be shared with Lytton First Nation in a community engagement summary, which will be used to inform the project’s next steps.